Teagan White
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Bloodroot, Oleander, Opium, Larkspur

Nice bugs and toxic plants; some paintings for the "House Party" group show at Mondo Gallery.

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Oleander  |  7"x9"  |  gouache & watercolor on paper 

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Opium  |  7"x9"  |  gouache & watercolor on paper

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Larkspur  |  7"x9"  |  gouache & watercolor on paper

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Bloodroot  |  7"x9"  |  gouache & watercolor on paper

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Bloodroot, Oleander, Opium, Larkspur

mondo gallery
austin, tx
march 2016


Nice bugs and toxic plants; some paintings for the "House Party" group show at Mondo Gallery.

These pieces were reproduced as a set of four mini prints in a screen printed envelope, released by The VACVVM.

Oleander: Among the most toxic of all ornamental garden plants, oleander is poisonous to most mammals in all its parts. In South India, villagers have been known to swallow plum seeds from the widely cultivated Yellow Oleander as a method of suicide.

Opium: Unripe seedpods from the opium poppy can be processed into the addictive drug opium and its derivatives: codeine, heroin, and morphine. Poppy poisoning is marked by erratic behavior, loss of appetite, stupor, and coma; overdoses cause death by respiratory failure.

Larkspur: Cattle can be highly susceptible to sickness and death from grazing in larkspur-infested areas. Ingestion of the toxic young flowers and pods leads to paralysis, respiratory failure, bloat, and death.

Bloodroot: A member of the poppy family, bloodroot is often the first plant to be spotted at the end of winter, its buds sprouting up in wooded areas throughout the Midwest, Eastern US, and Canada. Poisoning from its acrid red sap leads to vomiting, fainting, and potentially fatal coma.

Gouache & watercolor on paper.